From drought to peace

Because of the long lines, the children would be delayed in going to school and sometimes just missed classes altogether. Manjula and Komaraiah worked nine to 11-hour days and often could not any water collect water. Today, it is a different story: Manjula’s family has an individual water connection right at their home.

Manjula and her husband Komaraiah used to make their living as agricultural workers. Then, a drought forced them to move to Arjunnagar slum, India, with their three daughters 10 years ago.

The oldest daughter, Madhavi, is married; Manasa is 16-years-old, and the youngest daughter, Manisha, is 12 years old. Manjula now works as a cleaner in an office, and her husband runs a rickshaw. He earns Rs.100 /-to Rs.200/-[$2.24 – 4.48 USD] per day. They recently bought a 20 yard plot of land to build a house.

Like everyone in the slum, Manjula’s family also faced difficulty in collecting water. When the water tanker came to their area, they would collect three or four pots. But because of the long lines, the children would be delayed in going to school and sometimes just missed classes altogether. Because Manjula and Komaraiah worked nine to 11-hour days, they could not collect water. Sometimes they would buy water from others in order to spare time for house work.

Today, it is a different story. Manjula’s family has an individual water connection right at their home, with the help of Water.org and its local partner, SIDUR.

Manjula said, “Now there is no problem, and we need not go out to fetch water; we don’t have to pay anyone.” She collects water on alternate days and has more time to spend with her children. She also has peace of mind now that this most basic need is being met – and without a sacrifice required by her children.

This project made possible by PepsiCo Foundation.

Capital: New Delhi
Population of 1.2 billion
77 million lack access to safe water
769 million lack access to improved sanitation
59% of the total population lives on less than US$2 per day
India