In January, Water.org kicked off additional programming in the Central Plateau of Haiti. Meetings with DINEPA, the Haitian government water quality regulatory authority, took us to the outskirts of Port-au-Prince near where these homes crowd the hillsides outside Penionville, Haiti.

During a site visit in February, a woman in Bangalore, India collects water to take home from a public water connection.

Rig operators make progress on drilling a deep borehole well near La Jeune, Haiti.

Water.org co-founders Matt Damon and Gary White visited programs in Haiti to evaluate water projects and visit communities in need.

Kids make up games while waiting in line. Shared water connections may serve 16 families or more, and only run a few hours each day.

Every day, Haitians congregate at this river to wash, bathe, and collect the day's cooking and drinking water.

A boy proudly displays his family's new toilet in India, decorated for a visit from Water.org's local partners.

During a summer visit to Port-au-Price, and just before hurricane season, sewage and garbage choke a creek, polluting water used by others downstream.

Women conduct water-quality testing in Karikili, India.

In societies around the world, the burden of collecting water falls overwhelmingly on the shoulders of women. Here, a young woman carries water through the streets in Bangalore, India.

Children with reliable and safe water access have better chances of staying healthy and remaining in school.

Mrs. Beth Muguru and the water storage tank she purchased for her farm. It collects rainwater and well water and is a dependable source of water for home and agricultural use.

Applying for a WaterCredit Microloan. Financial partners keep detailed records of the WaterCredit loans made. Most people applying for loans have attended neighborhood financial meetings and know what to expect.

Program managers from the Water.org India office interview borrowers to ensure their water solution stays operational long-term.

Microloans helped this business owner expand production of her sari loom business.

Annet Kirumira (far right) operates a water kiosk, under programming by Water.org's local Ugandan partners. As a majority of her customers are women, she also added a ladies shoe business inside the kiosk.

A young woman proudly shows her WaterCredit loan card. WaterCredit loans provide families with the money to install a toilet, or connect their home to the local water system, and are paid back at an average 98% success rate.

In villages without water access, people are forced to buy water — by the liter and no matter the cost — from water vendors, like this one in Kenya.

In a Haitian village with reliable, clean well water, kids are healthy and help with chores. Washing hands with soap has been found to reduce children's diarrhea by more than 40%.

In just one day, an estimated 152 million hours of women and girls' time is consumed for the most basic of human needs—collecting water for domestic use.

An unsanitary, open sewer runs along this girl's home in Bangalore, India.

A new, well-built toilet block in Kenya. The pipes channel away bad smells and keep out flies.

A boy gets a drink of water from a shared waterpoint.

Water.org’s local partners employ street plays and skits to educate the public about the dangers of waterborne illnesses.

Women at a training workshop learn the stone masonry skills to build an Ecosan toilet in Trichy, India.

School children celebrate World Water Day by carrying water and sanitation messages in a local parade.

Women in a community meeting create a social map of their neighborhood. This type of map helps the communities visualize where open defecation occurs and plan locations for their new infrastructure.

2012 was an exciting year for Water.org and the people we work with around the world. Thanks to supporters like you, thousands of people have gained access to water and sanitation over the past twelve months. Along the way, images were captured by Water.org staff and local partners that help tell the story of the water crisis in ways words can't.

Water.org archives all field photos on Flickr, and are licensed CC Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share Alike.