Indonesia's water and sanitation crisis

Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world and Southeast Asia’s largest economy, with 258 million inhabitants. Average income levels have increased dramatically over the last 20 years, yet more than 27 million Indonesians lack safe water, and 51 million lack access to improved sanitation facilities.

For millions of low-income Indonesian families, new water connections, water wells and improved toilets are unaffordable without additional financing which helps spread the investment cost over time. Fortunately, there is a growing microfinance sector serving low-income households across the country, and they are recognizing that financing for water supply and sanitation is a growing need. 

For millions of low-income Indonesian families, new water connections, water wells and improved toilets are unaffordable without additional financing which helps spread the investment cost over time.

Our impact in Indonesia

Water.org introduced WaterCredit in Indonesia in 2014. Since then, we have opened an office in Jakarta, hired staff and launched local partnerships with seventeen microfinance institutions. We continue to expand our presence by pursuing partnerships with different types of organizations, including partnerships with associations and rural banks.

Water.org sees great potential to scale up our impact by collaborating with water utilities in both rural and urban areas. Community-based organizations are responsible for providing water and sanitation services to rural communities. We develop their operations and financial viability, and help them secure loans to improve services and support expansion to reach more people with water connections. We are also working with urban water utilities to improve their credit services for poor customers’ water connections, and to access commercial capital to expand service coverage with new water infrastructure.

  • Featured

    Sariati's water crisis is over

    For generations, women in Sariati’s family faced an impossible choice when it came to giving their families water - certain death without water, or possible death from consuming unsafe water. For these women in Indonesia and millions of others around the world, collecting water would take up to six hours each day.

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    Sariati
  • Featured

    Being poor costs more than you think

    Erni is a wife, mother and schoolteacher who lives on the outskirts of Jakarta. Her story reminds us that access to safe water is an opportunity for financial independence.

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    Erni's family in Indonesia

Stories of people we empower in Indonesia

To help us reach more people in need of safe water and sanitation in Indonesia, donate today.

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